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HSF Terms & Definitions

Youth Organizing
Multi-generational Organizing
Inter-generational
Cross-generational
Power
Family
Community Organizing
Economic Justice Organizing
Racial Justice Analysis

 

 

Youth Organizing
HSF defines Youth Organizing as community-based efforts that promote the leadership of youth (particularly low-income youth of color) in identifying systemic problems impacting youth and their communities, and implementing strategic actions that change policies or institutions. The focus, however, cannot be exclusively on policy reform and/or institutional change. Policy reforms must be accompanied by larger shifts in the ways different communities are valued and represented that paves the way for new voices to be heard. In addition to leadership development, political education and organizing training, youth organizing often strives to meet some of the other developmental needs of its youth members and leaders
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Multi-generational Organizing
Refers to organizing efforts that bring together youth (18yrs and younger) and adults to share leadership and power within organizing campaigns and decision-making structures (i.e., organizations, coalitions, networks, etc). For our purposes, there are two types of multi-generational organizing arrangements, inter-generational and cross-generational.
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Inter-generational
Where youth and adults share leadership in the design, implementation and evaluation of organizing campaigns, as well as the management of a particular organization (i.e. board or senior management level).
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Cross-generational
Where youth-led organizations/projects and adult led organizations come together in networks or coalitions to do joint work. Youth in these settings have power and leadership in the direction of the coalition’s efforts, but not within the decision-making structures of the other coalition member organizations.
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Power
We use power here to mean the ability and capacity of people to come together collectively, develop common goals, vision, strategy and action to change systems and relationships among and between people and institutions. This requires that people develop their leadership skills and other skills; build authentic and committed relationships with one another; increase their knowledge of socio-cultural, political and economic issues; and the complexity of how public and private decisions are made and influenced; develop their individual and collective sense of efficacy and their critical consciousness and disposition to take action for change.
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Family
By family we mean a concept of relationships between people that is inclusive of, but broader than the traditional blood relationships. We speak of families in the sense of affiliative relationships between people that is based on a sense of shared and common destiny, legacy, interest, purpose and commitment. Thus immigrant day laborers not only represent low-income families because of the support they provide to their relatives at home through the remittance economy, but also because they share common issues and interests with one another by facing many of the same conditions. This definition of family is not only meant to be inclusive, but also asserts the fundamental necessity of building relationships between people.
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Community Organizing
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Economic Justice Organizing
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Racial Justice Analysis
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